government

  • Program Management Improvement Accountability Act (S: 1550)

    The value of project management, while not necessarily universal, is proven to improve collaboration, better risk management, higher efficiency, better decision-making, and more favorable project outcomes.1 Despite the evolution of project management practices in the private sector, government project statistics indicate a dearth of high-performing projects. Only 64 percent of government projects achieve their goals . The Government Accountability Office’s (GAO’s) 2015 High-Risk List indicates project and program management challenges in many of the 32 risks . The list spoke to project and program vulnerabilities due to waste and mismanagement and addressed the need for transformation in project and program economy, efficiency and effectiveness. Some of the key areas for improvement included transformation at the U.S.

    Program Management Improvement Accountability Act (S: 1550)

  • Creating More Value for Others through Better Project Management

    How do you define career success, and how do you know when you’ve attained it? Perhaps there’s a particular salary level you’d like to reach, or maybe for you “career success” means working in your dream job. But think a little deeper. Say you get that dream job - what would it look like for you to reach your highest potential in that position? Here at Cheetah Learning, we tend to define “success” a little differently than the way most people use this term. With regard to our students, we truly believe that their success is our success.

    That is to say, we find that the value you create for others is a crucial part of your own career success. Regardless of your job type or position, there are numerous ways you can leverage your strengths to help others reach their personal and professional goals. In this article, we’ll outline ways you can create more value for others in four key dimensions of your professional and personal life: work clients and other direct project beneficiaries; your supervisors and your organization; your co-workers; and, outside of work, the people you’re closest to in your life.

    Creating More Value for Others through Better Project Management

  • Email or Phone Conference? Making the Most of Communication Technologies in Each Project Phase

    Many projects team members do not work in the same location any longer - even those working in the government sector. And even if they are in the same location, team members rely extensively on virtual communication tools rather than face to face communication. Using communication and collaboration technology tools is the norm - and we’re not even addressing all the cool software tools designed specifically to manage projects.

    Email or Phone Conference? Making the Most of Communication Technologies in Each Project Phase

  • Can Government Projects Be “Agile?”

    By now the myth that agile principles and practices are incompatible with PMBOK® Guide standards has been thoroughly debunked. Furthermore, Project Managers are increasingly recognizing a move toward agile practices as a “best practice” in the PM field. According to the 2011 CHAOS Manifesto from the Standish Group, agile projects were shown to succeed three times more than non-agile or “waterfall” projects.

    Their report goes on to say that “the Agile process is the universal remedy for software development project failure. Software applications developed through the agile process have three times the success rate of the traditional waterfall method and a much lower percentage of time and cost overruns.” The report defined a successful project in terms of being on budget, on time, and with all of the planned features.

    Can Government Projects Be “Agile?”

  • 10 Tips to Help Project Managers Shine When They Present to Senior Executives

    The opportunity for Project Managers to present to senior executives can be a “good news, bad news” venture.  The good news is that it gives the PM the chance to showcase his or her capability before the people in the organization who have great influence on promotions, decisions on which projects to bid on,etc. The bad news is that a poor presentation to these senior people can cast a negative shadow over the perception of the PM’s capability.

    10 Tips to Help Project Managers Shine When They Present to Senior Executives

  • Part 2 of Bring Home the Bacon! The Four-phase Collaboration Between Project Managers and Proposal Professionals

    I hope that readers of Part One have “bought in” to the twin concepts (A) that Project Managers and Proposal Managers should work closely and early from the beginning of the bid process, and (B) that Project managers, who will be charged with “bringing home the bacon” in the oral presentation, should improve their presentation skills, not rely on their technical expertise alone.

    Part 2 of Bring Home the Bacon! The Four-phase Collaboration Between Project Managers and Proposal Professionals

  • Bring Home the Bacon! Why Project Managers Should Improve Their Presentation Skills

    Introduction

    This essay is Part one of two articles for the PMIWDC webpage. It evolves from my November 4th PM Tools presentation at the Crystal City Sheraton.

    In this first part, I want to explain (a) why proposal managers/writers and project managers must work in concert, not separately as is often the case. Then (b) I’ll provide advice to enable project managers to improve their presentation skills. This advice will be based on the methodology that is the heart of my executive workshops.

     In Part two, to be published on the PMIWDC website at a later date, I will outline an integrated four phase process by which writers and presenters can develop contract-winning synergy.

    Bring Home the Bacon! Why Project Managers Should Improve Their Presentation Skills

  • The Oral Presentation: Tie-Breaker for Winning Government Contracts

    Over the past decade, the Federal Government has placed increasing emphasis on the "oral presentation" in awarding contracts. Additionally, Government agencies, in their Request for Proposal (RFP), are stipulating that only those who will be working on the contract, especially Project Managers, are to deliver the oral presentation.

    This is obviously intended to permit government evaluators to have an "eye-to-eye" meeting with those with whom they will be working, thereby resolving issues and questions before the contract is awarded.

    In a very real sense, the once lightly regarded oral presentation has become the essential tie-breaker among otherwise equal companies vying for lucrative contracts from the government.

    The Oral Presentation: Tie-Breaker for Winning Government Contracts

Thank you to Our Sponsors

Diamond

Platinum

Gold

Friend